Dispatch News – Eq Muscle Release http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 18:21:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/eqmusclerelease-icon-70x70.png Dispatch News – Eq Muscle Release http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/ 32 32 City pivots to ask for commercial trash pickup proposals http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/city-pivots-to-ask-for-commercial-trash-pickup-proposals/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 17:42:56 +0000 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/city-pivots-to-ask-for-commercial-trash-pickup-proposals/

STARKVILLE — State law caused city officials to pivot Tuesday on a plan to contract out its commercial garbage collection service to a private company.

Aldermen voted 6-1 in a suspension meeting at City Hall to send out a public request for proposals to privatize the service.

Originally, the board planned to consider a subcontract with Waste Pro Mississippi to support pickup for more than 300 commercial and apartment complex customers. But officials discovered before Tuesday’s meeting a state law that requires the RFP process for solid waste contracts over $50,000.

In the Waste Pro contract proposal, the company would have taken over the pickup of the city’s 4, 6, and 8 cubic yard commercial dumpsters at the same rates the city currently charges, as well as adding a customer option for a 2- cubic yard dumpster. Waste Pro also planned to buy these dumpsters from the city in stages. The city would remain responsible for billing, at least initially, and pass on fare collections to the contractor.

Mayor Lynn Spruill told The Dispatch after the meeting that the city would consider proposals from other companies based on rates, how quickly they could purchase the dumpsters and the city’s two commercial collection trucks – which would eventually knock the city out of commercial pickup altogether.

“The goal is to make sure that a private company can provide a service that we can be proud of (before completely transforming it),” Spruill said.

Business services costs continue to outpace revenues, health and environmental services manager Christopher Smiley told the board.

Unlike residential pickup, the city does not have a franchise for commercial pickup, meaning these customers can contract directly with companies like Waste Pro. It happens more often, he said, especially since the city doesn’t offer services like commercial recycling.

“That’s really the driving force behind it,” Smiley said. “Over the past few years, we have lost customers.

The contracting out is also expected to save the city approximately $300,000 for the purchase of a new front-loading truck for commercial service.

While most aldermen voiced support for contracting out the service, Ward 7 Alderman Henry Vaughn – the only vote against the RFP – raised concerns about outsourcing a service from the city.

Vaughn noted his opposition to outsourcing the city’s parks and recreation management to a third party, which the council pushed through in October. He said that by outsourcing commercial garbage collection, it would set a precedent that would inevitably lead the city to outsource residential collection one day.

Spruill pushed back, saying she would not support privatizing residential pickup during her term as mayor.

“If you all do it, I’ll veto it, so you better bring five,” Spruill warned, noting how many aldermen votes it takes to override a mayor’s veto.

“You registered me, so (if residential pickup is privatized) it would have to be after 2025. … The private sector can’t do residential pickup better than we can.”

Vaughn stood firm on his prediction.

“It may not happen on your watch,” he said. “But when your watch is finished, it will happen.”

In other cases, the aldermen approved an updated unified development code.

First adopted in 2019, the updated version consists mainly of small tweaks and typographical fixes. However, it also adds requirements for citizens to obtain a permit to erect exposed structures and submit a plan to repair the structure and remove the panels within 180 days.

The code, which takes effect Oct. 20, applies to residential and commercial structures, both vacant and occupied.

Zack Plair is the editor of The Dispatch.

Quality and thorough journalism is essential to a healthy community. The Dispatch brings you the most comprehensive reporting and insightful commentary from the Golden Triangle, but we need your help to continue our efforts. Please consider subscribing to our website for only $2.30 per week to help support local journalism and our community.

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Multiple California police agencies facing 9-1-1 dispatch outages http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/multiple-california-police-agencies-facing-9-1-1-dispatch-outages/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 18:00:34 +0000 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/multiple-california-police-agencies-facing-9-1-1-dispatch-outages/

CHICO, CA—Early Monday, telephone services at the 9-1-1 dispatch center were reported to be down by multiple agencies in the northern state.

When called by a landline or cell phone, the caller is greeted with a busy signal, according to a social media post from the Chico Police Department.

In a separate social media post, the Butte County Sheriff’s Office said the agency’s dispatch center was also affected.

“The City of Chico is currently experiencing an outage in landline telephone connectivity. Incoming calls to the Chico Police Dispatch Center via 911 are not being received,” said a news release from the Chico Police Department.

“We are actively working with service providers to get your 9-1-1 services fully functioning as soon as possible and will provide an update when information becomes available,” the police department said.

During the emergency outage, people can still text 9-1-1. Upstate agencies have provided alternate phone numbers that can be used while the emergency dispatch center remains impacted. The state and AT&T are aware of the situation.

Chico Police Department

The telephone number for the Chico Police Department Dispatch Center is 530-228-1347 or 530-720-0593.

Butte County Sheriff’s Office

The Butte County Sheriff’s Office phone number is 530-990-4714.

Glenn County Sheriff’s Office

The phone number for the Glenn County Sheriff’s Office is 530-720-7152

Red Bluff and Tehama County Police Department

The Red Bluff Police Department’s phone number is 530-526-5525 and the Tehama County Sheriff’s Office number is 530-526-8431.

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(c)2022 Chico Enterprise-Record, California

Visit Chico Enterprise-Record, CA at www.chicoer.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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The Queen’s 8 grandchildren hold a silent vigil next to her coffin – Oneida Dispatch http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/the-queens-8-grandchildren-hold-a-silent-vigil-next-to-her-coffin-oneida-dispatch/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 17:06:27 +0000 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/the-queens-8-grandchildren-hold-a-silent-vigil-next-to-her-coffin-oneida-dispatch/

By JILL LAWLESS, DANICA KIRKA and MIKE CORDER

LONDON (AP) — Queen Elizabeth II’s eight grandchildren stood in silent vigil next to her coffin on Saturday, capping another huge day in which thousands of people came to pay their respects. Mourners crowded into a line that snaked through London, enduring the city’s coldest night in months and waits that lasted until 4 p.m.

Authorities warned colder weather was expected on Saturday evening. “Tonight’s forecast is cold. Warm clothes are recommended,” the ministry in charge of the line tweeted.

As US President Joe Biden and other world leaders and dignitaries traveled to London ahead of the Queen’s state funeral on Monday, a wave of people wishing to say goodbye poured into Parliament’s Westminster Hall for another day Saturday. This is where the queen’s coffin rests, draped in her royal standard and topped with a crown set with diamonds.

The number of mourners has steadily increased since the public was first admitted on Wednesday, with a queue that winds its way around Southwark Park and stretches for at least 8 kilometres.

Honoring their patience, King Charles III and his eldest son Prince William paid an unannounced visit on Saturday to greet those waiting to pass Elizabeth’s coffin, shaking hands and thanking mourners in the queue near Lambeth Bridge.

Later, all of the Queen’s grandchildren stood by her coffin. William and Prince Harry, sons of Charles, were joined by Princess Anne’s children, Zara Tindall and Peter Philips; the daughters of Prince Andrew, Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie; and Prince Edward’s two children – Lady Louise Windsor and James, Viscount Severn.

William, now the heir to the throne, stood with his head bowed at the head of the coffin and Harry at the foot. The two princes, who are military veterans, were in uniform. Mourners continued to march in silence.

Harry, who served in Afghanistan as a British Army officer, wore civilian clothes earlier in the week as the Queen’s coffin left Buckingham Palace because he is no longer an active member of the Royal family. He and his wife Meghan left their royal duties and moved to the United States in 2020. The king, however, asked William and Harry to wear their military uniforms during the Westminster Hall vigil.

Ahead of the wake, Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie released a statement praising their “beloved grandma”.

“We, like many, thought you would be here forever. And we all miss you terribly. You were our matriarch, our guide, our loving hand on our back leading us through this world. You have taught us so much and we will cherish those lessons and memories forever,” the sisters wrote.

People lining up to see the Queen are of all ages and come from all walks of life. Many bowed before the coffin or made the sign of the cross. Several veterans, their medals sparkling, offered lively salutes. Some people cried. Others blew kisses. Many hugged as they walked away, proud to have spent hours queuing to pay their respects, even if it lasted only a few moments.

Overnight, volunteers handed out blankets and cups of tea to people queuing as temperatures dropped to 6 degrees Celsius (43 degrees Fahrenheit). Despite the weather, the mourners described the warmth of a shared experience.

“It was cold at night, but we had wonderful companions, met new friends. The camaraderie was wonderful,” said Chris Harman from London. “It was worth it. I would do it again and again and again. I would walk to the ends of the earth for my queen.

People had many reasons to come, from affection for the Queen to wanting to be part of a historic moment. Simon Hopkins, who traveled from his home in central England, compared it to “a pilgrimage”.

“(It’s) a little weird, because that kind of stuff goes against my grain,” he said. “I was kind of drawn into it.”

Saturday’s vigil followed Friday’s in which the Queen’s four children – Charles, Anne, Andrew and Edward – stood vigil outside the coffin.

Edward said the Royal Family were “overwhelmed by the wave of emotions that engulfed us and the huge number of people who went out of their way to express their love, admiration and respect (for) our dear mum”.

On Saturday, the new king held audiences with new prime ministers, governors general of kingdoms and military leaders.

The Metropolitan Police arrested a man during the viewing on Friday evening on suspicion of a public order offence. Parliamentary authorities said someone stepped out of the queue and tried to approach the coffin.

Tracey Holland told Sky News her 7-year-old niece Darcy Holland was pushed aside by a man who tried to “run to the coffin, raise the standard and try to do I don’t know what”. She said police arrested the man in “two seconds”.

The in-state lie continues until Monday morning, when the Queen’s coffin will be transported to nearby Westminster Abbey for a state funeral, the final 10 days of national mourning for the longest-serving monarch in Britain. Elizabeth, 96, died at her estate of Balmoral in Scotland on September 8 after 70 years on the throne.

After Monday’s service at the Abbey, the late Queen’s coffin will be transported through the historic heart of London on a horse-drawn carriage. She will then be taken by hearse to Windsor, where the Queen will be buried alongside her late husband, Prince Philip, who died last year.

Hundreds of soldiers from the British army, air force and navy held an early morning rehearsal on Saturday for the final procession. As the troops lined up the scenic path leading to Windsor Castle, the thud of drums echoed through the air as marching bands marched past a hearse.

London police said the funeral would be the force’s biggest ever police event, surpassing even the 2012 Summer Olympics and the Platinum Jubilee in June celebrating 70 years of the Queen’s reign.

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Follow AP coverage of Queen Elizabeth II at https://apnews.com/hub/queen-elizabeth-ii

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Letter: Herman Garcia deserves recognition http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/letter-herman-garcia-deserves-recognition/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 17:22:47 +0000 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/letter-herman-garcia-deserves-recognition/

English Spanish Spanish

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William Ray LaBorde – Brainerd Dispatch http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/william-ray-laborde-brainerd-dispatch/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 16:13:00 +0000 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/william-ray-laborde-brainerd-dispatch/

William Ray LaBorde, 76, of Fairfield Township, passed away peacefully in hospital with his family by his side on September 2, 2022, after sustaining a fall injury. Bill was born August 20, 1946 in Crosby, Minnesota to Phyllis (Olander) and George LaBorde. He was the second eldest of eight children.

Bill was a Vietnam War veteran and member of the Ironton American Legion Post 443. After working for Scorpion in Crosby upon his return from the military, Bill worked with the Teamsters union for 35 years in the division of the construction of pipelines and on film productions. . He was a devoted father to his son William and daughter Jodi. In 1984 Bill married his loving wife of 38 years Julie.

Bill loved the outdoors and enjoyed fishing and gardening with his wife and also hunting with friends and family. Bill loved to tease and had a memorable laugh and beaming smile. He was kind, generous and friendly to everyone he met. He loved deeply and always told you how he felt, never missing an opportunity to let you know he cared. He often visited family and friends and shared everything but his secret fishing spots.

Bill is survived by his wife Julie (Gordon) LaBorde; son Bill (Johnny Randall) LaBorde of Las Vegas; his daughter Jodi (Eric) McDonald of Las Vegas; one brother Randy LaBorde of Breezy Point; four sisters, his twin Marilyn (Gene) Moritz of Crosby, Dianna Erickson of California, Wendy Johnson of Deerwood and Judy (Greg) Steinke of Deerwood; two sisters-in-law, Kathy LaBorde of Fairfield Township and Jennifer Turner of Crosslake; granddaughter Kylie McDonald of Las Vegas; great-grandson Ozzy Hampton of Las Vegas; and several nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews.

Before Bill in death were his parents and two brothers, George LaBorde Jr. “Louie” and James “Jim” LaBorde.

A memorial service will be held at noon on Saturday, October 1, 2022 at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Crosby. Visitation will be one hour before the church service.

Arrangements are with Koop Funeral Home in Crosby.

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Bataan Memorial March 2022 click! Gallery – Brainerd Dispatch http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/bataan-memorial-march-2022-click-gallery-brainerd-dispatch/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 01:51:00 +0000 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/bataan-memorial-march-2022-click-gallery-brainerd-dispatch/

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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People take part in the 25th annual Bataan Memorial March on Saturday September 10, 2022 in Brainerd.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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The Freedom Flight POW/MIA hot air balloon was on hand during the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Walk on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022, at the Crow Wing County Fairgrounds.

Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch

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Johnson and Kinder vying for CVB board opening http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/johnson-and-kinder-vying-for-cvb-board-opening/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 17:11:32 +0000 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/johnson-and-kinder-vying-for-cvb-board-opening/

So far, two people have applied for an open seat on the board of the Columbus-Lowndes Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Outgoing board member Sonic Johnson asked to be reappointed, and Fred Kinder also applied for the position.

Johnson was appointed in March 2020 to serve the remainder of General Thomas “Tango” Moore’s term following Moore’s resignation.

Johnson is a 37-year Air Force veteran, who retired in 2019. For 15 years, he served as chief of public affairs at Columbus Air Force Base.

“I’ve worked with CVB for 20 years,” he told The Dispatch on Thursday afternoon. “I see it’s an incredible organization and I see its value. I came on board because I want to serve the community and stay connected after I retire. I have lived in Columbus longer than I have lived anywhere in my life.

Johnson said he wanted to increase CVB’s transparency and relationships with all levels of the community.

“I want to increase understanding and transparency of this organization and what it does,” he said. “I want to increase harmony with the city, the county, the (Golden Triangle Development LINK), with everyone.”

Johnson, during his tenure with the ACBA, helped organize the 2001 and 2003 Wings Over Columbus Air Shows. He is currently co-owner of Healthy Home Solutions.

Kinder told The Dispatch he applied because he wanted to help expand CVB’s focus beyond festivals.

“I enjoy festivals, but I think we need to look for more sporting events,” he said. “The Magnolia Tennis Club used to have a Southeast tournament here, and it brought people from Georgia, South Carolina, Louisiana, Tennessee, Kentucky.”

He said he thinks the organization needs to tackle football, softball, Dizzy Dean and even fishing tournaments.

“These are people who spend two or three days in a hotel and eat in a restaurant,” he said. “These people have money. I just think we’re not doing enough (recruiting sports tournaments). I think that goal needs to change a bit.

Kinder has served on numerous local boards, including for the Columbus Arts Council, Community Theater, Mississippi Theater Association, and Friends of the Library. He is also a member of the Lee Home Foundation. He was treasurer of Camp Rising Sun for 19 years.

Johnson’s term expires Oct. 1. This seat is the only seat jointly appointed by the chairman of the Lowndes County Board of Supervisors and the mayor of Columbus.

The city and county appoint four members each to fill the nine-member council.

Brian Jones is the local government reporter for Columbus and Lowndes County.

Quality and thorough journalism is essential to a healthy community. The Dispatch brings you the most comprehensive reporting and insightful commentary from the Golden Triangle, but we need your help to continue our efforts. Please consider subscribing to our website for only $2.30 per week to help support local journalism and our community.

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It Was Brainerd – September 7 – Brainerd Expedition http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/it-was-brainerd-september-7-brainerd-expedition/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 09:00:00 +0000 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/it-was-brainerd-september-7-brainerd-expedition/

SEPTEMBER 7

20 years ago (2002)

Defense was expected to be one of the strengths of Warrior football this year as they fired seven defensive players. That proved correct as Brainerd shut down 8th-ranked Alexandria 27-14 in front of a capacity crowd here. Defensive backs Jake Phillips and Kevin Mertens intercepted passes and three Warriors picked up fumbles.

30 years ago (1992)

Franklin Junior High started their 60se year with 80 additional students compared to last year. The school inherits the large classes that have overwhelmed Washington Middle School in recent years. Brainerd High School also added approximately 45 additional students this year as it grew.

40 years ago (1982)

(Pictured) Ernest Gosse of the Meadowview Trailer Court trapped this albino pocket gopher in Sylvan Prairie, just east of Fisherman’s Bridge. The creature is the only albino Gosse has ever seen, although he trapped thousands of pocket gophers for many years, so he had it ridden by a taxidermist.

60 Years Ago (1962)

Washington High School sophomores toured the new YMCA building today. The boys will swim at the “Y” every Friday as part of their regular gym class, while the girls will swim on Mondays. During the rest of the week, the swimming pool will be used by primary school children.

80 years ago (1942)

War bond sales in Brainerd at the end of the seventh day of the September campaign, sponsored by Brainerd’s two theaters, totaled $41,127, according to Elmer Peterson, chairman of the county’s bond sale. Practice opened with a parade in theaters a week ago.

100 years ago (1922)

A group of Brainerd businessmen are reported to be meeting with the executive committee of striking railway workers at the offices of the Chamber of Commerce. The intention of the meeting is to discuss the issue of granting credit to strikers and other issues relating to the strike situation.

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Venice Dispatch – Banshees of Inisherin – Awardsdaily http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/venice-dispatch-banshees-of-inisherin-awardsdaily/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 16:37:24 +0000 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/venice-dispatch-banshees-of-inisherin-awardsdaily/

Good storytelling has magic, and when Martin McDonagh tells you a story, you know you’re in the hands of a true magician. His latest, THE BANSHES OF INISHERIN, is a sweet, funny, poignant and enchanting ode to the people of Ireland. It transports you to a place and a time, introduces you to a cast of lovable characters, and contains a profound message about the meaning of life. Those 109 minutes have flown away.

Set on the fictional island of Inisherin off the coast of Ireland in 1923, as civil war raged in the country, the film stars Colin Farrell as Pádraic and Brendan Gleeson as Colm . Pádraic is a kind and positive guy who is… let’s not say the brightest bulb in the box. As well as doing some light farming, he spends his time at the pub, particularly with his thoughtful and more mature musician pal, Colm. In fact, we catch him picking up Colm for a pub visit in the film’s opening scene. As he happily points out to the older man, it’s two o’clock.

Only this time, Colm turns him down. And as he later clarifies, he never wants to see or speak to Pádraic again. Bewildered and hurt, Pádraic tries to understand his best friend’s sudden change of heart. He consults with his sister Siobhan (Kerry Condon) and other islanders, including the bum Dominic (Barry Keoghan), even sends the priest to do his bidding. But that only strengthened Colm’s resolve to end their relationship, leading him to declare that he’ll cut off his finger every time Pádraic comes looking for him. Things escalate as Pádraic attempts to salvage this friendship; meanwhile, many characters come to understand their plight on the island and react in hopeful/desperate ways.

The first hour or so of the movie is endlessly endearing and hilarious. McDonagh populates Inisherin with memorable characters who form an ecosystem of alcohol-fueled gossip. There’s the cheerful bartender, the nosy grocer, the bad-tempered policeman, the possibly gay priest, and the witch Mrs. McCormick. In this island community where time stands still and nothing ever happens, someone who refuses to talk to their best friend is big news and everyone feels involved. Written with comic precision and a distinct Irish voice, the script perfectly captures the barely concealed curiosity and eagerness, the rough good humor of a people. It also brings the two leads to life in a compelling way, where Pádraic’s genuine bewilderment bounces off Colm’s thoughtful and inscrutable resolve. The dialogues jump off the page and you can’t help but fall in love with these often rude, probably drunk, always genuine people.

The story takes a decidedly serious turn in the last act. Without going into great detail or pretending to know the point McDonagh is trying to make, the film struck me as a reflection on what is left after a life lived. Is a legacy of artistic creation worth more than the memory of having been an honest person? And if a man has lost his decency, does the greatness of his achievement still mean anything? I also find the portrayal of what happens to Siobhan and Dominic inexplicably moving. Maybe the movie isn’t about a row between two pub buddies after all, but about the petty grudges and bitterness it symbolizes that characterize life in a place where the most cursed priest and policeman beats his own son, where everyone is busy doing nothing, just staving off the inevitable. The question is therefore whether we have the chance and the courage to do something, to change our own destiny.

McDonagh’s direction is eloquent and efficient, effortlessly bringing the gripping comedy to a dramatic ending. Farrell and Gleeson are both fantastic. They have kind of an inverted character arc as Pádraic and Colm go through their own changes, and they’ve both pulled it off. Farrell proves he hasn’t lost his acting skills. Bewilderment, outrage, or awkwardness in his dealings with Siobhan and the others is comedic gold. And when something terrible happens in the third act, the heartache and the bitterness it brings bear the brunt of this intense finale. Gleeson is an incredibly watchable actor. There is nothing fragile or unreal about him. His very presence—from his face to his posture, from the way he speaks to the way he walks—gives the film an anchor of humanity to stay grounded no matter the changes in tone. Supporting players Cordon and Keoghan are also excellent, each so naturally winning that they contribute significantly to the fullness of the narrative.

Thanks to Ben Davis’ textured, beautifully lit cinematography and breathtaking Irish scenery, the film looks incredible. And thanks to Carter Burwell’s whimsical, xylophone- and harp-centric score, it sounds like a dream. The 79th edition of the Venice Film Festival is shaping up to be one of the strongest in recent memory and my list of films that I can’t imagine going home empty-handed is growing. Farrell and/or Gleeson now join Brendan Fraser as bona fide candidates for the Coppa Volpi. And McDonagh is a real possibility for the script/director. The race is definitely on.

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Summer Storms Bring Fall Repairs – Brainerd Dispatch http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/summer-storms-bring-fall-repairs-brainerd-dispatch/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 16:00:00 +0000 http://www.eqmusclerelease.com/summer-storms-bring-fall-repairs-brainerd-dispatch/

BRAINERD – Several large storms have wreaked havoc on the Brainerd Lakes region this spring and summer.

Early morning storms on May 30 knocked out power to thousands of people in central Minnesota before a second wave of storms ripped through the area again later that night, toppling trees with heavy rain and high winds.

While many continued to make repairs and clean up the damage caused by the Memorial Day storm, a second round of severe storms rolled through the area again a few weeks later, between June 20 and 24.

Those two storms caused extensive damage across the county, said John Bowen, director of emergency management for the Crow Wing County Sheriff’s Office, who had just finished briefing cities, townships and co-ops on the How to Apply for Federal Disaster Relief.

Bowen said the damage from both storms met and exceeded the requirements to file a disaster relief claim. And all of the damage in the state from the May 30 storm prompted Minnesota to meet the requirements to file for federal disaster relief.

Dave Boran, left, and Jim Nelson carry a log through Boran’s yard Tuesday, June 21, 2022, in Brainerd. A severe storm rolled through the Brainerd area on Monday evening, knocking down trees and causing damage.

Steve Kohls/Brainerd Dispatch

“For the May 30 storm, I believe we were just under $700,000, which is our preliminary damage assessment,” Bowen said. “And on June 20, we had just over a million damage.”

In the event of a federal disaster, townships, cities and county are reimbursed 100% for eligible costs. For federal disaster relief, 75% comes from the federal government and the remaining 25% comes from the state government.

Disaster relief money is used to repair local and state infrastructure. For homeowners and businesses in the area, who had to turn to their insurance companies for help with their repairs and losses, there were many requests for funds and repairs and, as a result, the answers were slow. For example, the number of State Farm claims has reached 40,000, Jake Brandt, agency manager for Jake Brandt-State Farm Insurance told Brainerd.

“Whether it was wind or hail in the Brainerd Lakes area, due to the magnitude we experienced, we suffered a lot of property damage,” Brandt said.

Brandt said much of the owners’ personal property, such as boat lifts and docks, have been damaged this year by the strong gusts of wind associated with the storm, and it’s not uncommon for an owner has three different types of claims pending at the same time. time they have their homes, vehicles and personal belongings repaired.

“If you work in tree maintenance or roofing, this year has been good for them and bad for insurance companies,” Brandt said.

Trying to find contractors is difficult, Brandt said. With multiple storms moving through the state, tree service businesses were busy and building and construction contractors were hard to plan for even before the storm hit.

Brandt said many of his clients are finally getting roofs replaced as contractors work their way through damaged areas. However, delays in obtaining materials and the costs associated with these materials have also increased.

Jim Sodomka, branch manager at Weizenegger Engel Insurance, can attest to this. He said everyone is extremely busy right now, so it’s hard to find contractors who have the time to do repairs. .

“It was a big challenge to find someone to do the work to fix it,” Sodomka said.

Booked solidly for about six weeks with plenty of work still to come, Jamie Lyter, the managing director of Neumann Construction, said he had clients waiting just as long for adjusters to come to people’s homes.

IMG-2285-potvin.jpg

Photo taken at a house on North 6th Street this evening after the first wave of storms.

Contributed / Natalie Johnson

Shannon Christian, owner of Shannon’s Auto Body, said the auto repair industry started having vehicle owners become their own adjusters about five to six years ago with the widespread availability of smartphones.

These enhancements to filing an auto insurance claim come with their own challenges, and Christian said they’re often adjusted too low and often miss other damages associated with an accident.

Christian said his technicians and staff are trained to handle claims adjustments to get the most out of customer repairs, but they’re still seeing delays in receiving parts.

Lyter said he still gets calls from people who may not have been in the area during the storms, but are now having their roofs checked after seeing their neighbors making repairs.

“I guess you could say the Memorial Day storm was kind of the one that started it,” Lyter said. “Since probably the first or second week of June, it has been busy. We have three salespeople who work five or six days a week. And they haven’t stopped since.

Even after finding someone to do the job, Sodomka and Brandt said everything costs more to fix and they both recommend reviewing policies as they may not have enough coverage as repair prices rise. and materials.

Financial assistance is available for businesses, nonprofits, landlords and renters with a September 23 deadline

The Little Falls-based Initiative Foundation recently reported that about 40 homes and several businesses were inundated by floodwaters when the late June deluge – considered a 500-year rain event by the National Weather Service – made outflank the Little Elk River from its banks and outflank the community of Morrison County.

“On May 12, straight line winds over 85 mph caused damage in Todd County. The storms damaged dozens of homes, machine sheds, silos and barns. At least two of the houses are uninhabitable. Most homeowners have some level of insurance but experience a myriad of complications, ranging from high deductibles to insufficient coverage to significant delays in obtaining labor and materials for necessary repairs. “, reported the Initiative Foundation.

The SBA recently sent a reminder to Minnesota businesses, nonprofits, homeowners and renters of the September 23 deadline to apply for physical damage disaster loans. “Anyone in counties declared to have suffered property damage from severe thunderstorms and flooding on June 23 and 24 should apply for the low-interest disaster loan program,” the SBA reported, adding that the statement covers Morrison, Benton, Cass, Crow Wing, Mille Lacs, Stearns and Todd Counties.

Interest rates are as low as 2.935% for businesses, 1.875% for nonprofits, and 1.688% for homeowners and tenants, with terms up to 30 years. The SBA sets loan amounts and terms based on each applicant’s financial situation.

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application through the SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/ela/s/ and should apply under SBA Statement #17537.

TIM SPEIER, editor, can be reached on Twitter

@timmy2thyme

call 218-855-5859 or email

tim.speier@brainerddispatch.com

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